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Friday, November 25, 2005

Good bye, George Best

George Best, former Manchester United and Northern Ireland football star, has died at the age of 59.

"It was a long and very hard fight, but Mr George Best has died in the ICU at Cromwell Hospital," a spokesman for the Cromwell Hospital in London confirmed to the press.

"The thoughts of all staff at Cromwell Hospital are with Mr Best's family at this time."

Best who has had an alcohol problem for much of his public life, had been in hospital since the beginning of October and was put on a life support machine last week after he developed a lung infection.

A footballing legend who was dubbed the 'fifth Beatle' in his heyday, Best won the European Cup with the Red Devils in 1968 and was also crowned European Footballer of the year in that season.

After making his first team debut at just 17-years-of-age, he scored 178 goals in 466 appearances for Manchester United and was capped 37 by Northern Ireland.

A stint in the North American Soccer League with the Los Angeles Aztecs, Fort Lauderdale Strikers and San Jose Earthquakes amassed another 54 goals in 139 games.

As famous for his off-field behaviour as he was for his wizardry on the pitch, Best once quipped: "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered."

As stated on the official Manchester United website, www.manutd.com, 'It is unlikely we will ever see his like again'.

Monday, November 21, 2005

Ferguson: Man. Utd. should prepare for the next match and get over Keane

Sir Alex Ferguson insists his side is moving forward - and the coach works in the squad for the next Champions League game. The important matcj against Villarreal is very close, but Sir Alex fielded several questions about the effect Roy Keane’s departure has had on his squad.

"We must be focused on the game," said Sir Alex, speaking at his pre-match press conference.

Ferguson deflected one direct question on his reasoning for letting Roy Keane go. But he then discussed subjects such as the club’s next long-term captain and how the newer players in the team should add experience and consistency to their game. His message couldn’t have been clearer: he is only looking forward.

“That squad that won the European Cup in 1999 can’t last forever,” he said. “That’s natural, players age. That’s the bad part of managing this club for a long time, you watch your great players get older."